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Thread: Prado ARB Air Locker?

  1. #1

    Prado ARB Air Locker?

    Hey All,

    I am toying with the idea of getting a locker for my Prado. Just wondering what your thoughts are??? Should I be looking to get a front or rear locker ? As I can only afford one at the moment. I was thinking front but not too sure.

  2. #2

    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    Go for it I say :!: I had ARB put a rear locker in mine & it is fantastic. Check out the trip to Newnes State Forest on July 26th in the trip report section.

    Cheers, Glenn
    Cheers,
    Glenn
    2002 GXL 3.4 auto with BFG AT's, Lovell's/Bilstein suspension, ARB steel bullbar, winch, towbar, diff lock, air compressor, GME UHF & AM CB radios.
    Youtube Panoramio

  3. #3
    Advanced Member Yota's Avatar
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    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    Lockers are probably next on my list
    Was leaning towards a front locker, to save the CV's.
    Ill just do both so i dont have to decide
    Glenn
    2012 GX TD 150 with long mudflaps - http://www.pradopoint.com/showthread...370-Yota-s-150
    1996 GXL TD 95 with no mudflaps (sold) - http://www.pradopoint.com/showthread...-Build-Up-quot

  4. #4

    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    I went with a rear locker but the decision was made for me when I blew up the LSD ops:
    Everything I read previous to that was probably directing me towards a front locker but now I think I would do the rear first.

    Up hill... it'll be pushing you up the terrain rather than pulling you up it. So I figure if a car is heading up hill... the rear tyres would have the best chance of solid contact with the ground (with the weight of the car on at least one of them) rather than the front tyres... with less weight and scrabbling for traction.

    That's how I see it... whether it's correct or not... who knows
    Cheers,
    Leon
    There's no such thing as a wrong turn... it's just the scenic route!
    Optix Photographix

  5. #5
    Junior Member Ron.H.'s Avatar
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    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    I would go with the rear if you are only looking at 1at the moment. I couldn't decide either when I got mine so I did both seeing I could afford it at the time. I have had them about 4 and a half years now. The front locker does interfere with the steering a little as well it stiffens up and the turning circle is larger and if on a loose surface on a side slope it tends to crab sideways but the rest of the time it is great for traction on uneven surfaces rocks and so forth. With 2 you are nearly unstoppable if you have clearance.
    Cheers Ron.
    2001 3Lt Manual Diesel, Safari Snorkel, ARB Winch Bullbar, Hella Spotlights, 9000lb Warn Winch, Dual Battery, Couplertec Electronic Rust Prevention, Glind Hot Water Shower, ARB Front and Rear Air Lockers,Onboard Air Compressor, DP Chip, 40mm OME Lift, Steel Slider Side Steps, GME 3200 CB Radio, Milford Cargo Barrier, Extended Diff Breathers, Draw system and Fridge Slide, 40lt Engel Fridge, GPS with Wireless Reversing Camera, Rhino Roof Racks with Aluminium Tray, Awning and Drop down Table on Rear Door.

  6. #6
    Addicted PP Member MickL's Avatar
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    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    Should I be looking to get a front or rear locker ? As I can only afford one at the moment

    Here's an interesting take on locker installs from 4wd Systems in Adelaide;

    (They sell a soft locker so ignore d.)

    Which end should I fit first?

    This is dependent on the vehicle, its existing diff types, the type of suspension system and the model availability. However the front is usually the first choice.

    a. If the vehicle is an IFS (Independent Front Suspension) model then the front fitment will result in the greatest increase in 4WD ability. This is because all IFS vehicles have very limited suspension movement (hence limited wheel travel and articulation) resulting in easily lifted wheels and total loss of front traction. Fitting a LOKKA to the front will solve this serious deficiency. (Pajero, Isuzu, 4Runner, B2600 etc)

    b. If a vehicle has a good quality LSD in the rear, then a front fitment will obviously provide the best total traction ie one locker and one LSD is better than one locker and one standard diff. (GQ)

    c. If a vehicle has a poor quality LSD then the issue becomes less clear and personal preference or ease of installation often become the more important criteria. However one LSD and one locker is still a better choice - if that is possible. (Landcruiser, Hilux, F100/150)

    d. If the vehicle is a constant 4WD then a rear fitment is the easiest and best solution (Landcruiser 80,100 series etc)

    e. A front fitment will actually yield the greatest improvement in off road ability. This is because, most vehicles require the increase in traction (that a locker gives) when hill climbing. Under hill climbing conditions, due to the angle of the vehicle, the rear wheels are carrying a much greater weight (weight transfer) and the front wheels are therefore carrying a lessor weight and tend to break traction very easily. Once one front wheel starts to spin, the other front wheel stops turning and the whole front diff ceases to provide traction. At this point all load is transferred onto the rear as if it were a 2WD and due to the increased load the rear wheels are encouraged to spin and the vehicle stops.
    If you can solve the problem of the front wheels spinning, you have solved the traction problem. Another advantage is that on road there are no changes to normal driving characteristics at all.
    Mick
    1KZ-TE Turbo Diesel, 5 speed manual, 3.5 inch lift, 265/70/17 Mickey Thompson MTZ, D-Tronic chip, Boost controller, mandrel exhaust, dump pipe, modified intake, ARB steel bar, Magnum winch, Safari snorkel, rear drawers, half cargo barrier, dual batteries, Uniden UHF, Sat Nav, reverse camera, Magellan XL , Tjm bash plates, ARB alloy roof rack, rear telescopic work light and numerous other modifications!!!
    Now with 3BAR MAP sensor & 18PSI Boost!

  7. #7
    Advanced Member jcas24's Avatar
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    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    i did see a comparsion video on youtube a while ago, nolocker -v- front locker -v- rear locker, all tested in the same vehicle. It set my mind on what I thought, front first. I can't find the clip
    2000 Toyota Prado GXL- Gone, but not forgotten...
    '92 Landcruiser HDJ80 4"lift 33's
    '91 Surf LN130 coil sas, 4.8s, 35s
    '12 Jayco Eagle Outback

  8. #8

    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    Interesting... I figured it would be the other way around. (sure glad I put that disclaimer in there :lol: :lol: )
    Cheers,
    Leon
    There's no such thing as a wrong turn... it's just the scenic route!
    Optix Photographix

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    Yeh go the front first, the LSD helps a little in the back until they get hot. I had a air locker in the rear in my Vitara for a while but I found myself more in trouble than it was worth as I would end up in a nastier position due to the locker. The front will help you climb alot better, but loss your steering. Its the only negitive, Zook.
    97 Vitara 1.6 JX Day Tripper(550klms range), 98 Prado V6 LPG GXL for Touring (1400klms range), Offroad Cub Camper for Overnight.

  10. #10
    Advanced Member xlr8_87's Avatar
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    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    last time I checked ARB only made a rear locker for the 90 series? or at least there was only a rear locker for the 96?
    <Rob>
    '93 HZJ80 - DTS Turbo/Intercooler, 35's, Autocraft super flex 3" lift, Part-time 4WD, ARB Winch Bar, TPMS, EGT, DVD, Raslarr Rear Bar, Raslarr Sliders/Scrub Bars

  11. #11
    Addicted PP Member MickL's Avatar
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    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    last time I checked ARB only made a rear locker for the 90 series? or at least there was only a rear locker for the 96?
    1996 to 2003 front locker- 7.5" 10 bolt IFS - Fits all ratios- Part No RD90

    Mick
    1KZ-TE Turbo Diesel, 5 speed manual, 3.5 inch lift, 265/70/17 Mickey Thompson MTZ, D-Tronic chip, Boost controller, mandrel exhaust, dump pipe, modified intake, ARB steel bar, Magnum winch, Safari snorkel, rear drawers, half cargo barrier, dual batteries, Uniden UHF, Sat Nav, reverse camera, Magellan XL , Tjm bash plates, ARB alloy roof rack, rear telescopic work light and numerous other modifications!!!
    Now with 3BAR MAP sensor & 18PSI Boost!

  12. #12

    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    If the Prado was a part time 4wd instead of an awd mine would already have an auto locker in the front. I will be doing both but I will admit I am not a fan of air lockers in the front of an IFS. They put a lot of strain on CVs unlike auto lockers that can allow one wheel to spin faster reducing the pressure, but seeing as its an awd you dont have much choice. If you can only go one go the rear although I believe that the front makes more difference :wink:
    Trail Toy - TJ Wrangler with some mods and some bling

    Wifes Daily and Tourer - V6 120 Prado, some mods wife wont give me the keys.

  13. #13

    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    Postby boof on Wed Aug 19, 2009 8:49 pm
    If the Prado was a part time 4wd instead of an awd mine would already have an auto locker in the front. I will be doing both but I will admit I am not a fan of air lockers in the front of an IFS. They put a lot of strain on CVs unlike auto lockers that can allow one wheel to spin faster reducing the pressure, but seeing as its an awd you dont have much choice. If you can only go one go the rear although I believe that the front makes more difference :wink:
    Assuming that the prado centre diff has not been toyed with and it's still a full time AWD/4WD, why do you recommend doing the rear locker first but still suggest that the front will provide more benefit? Are you suggesting that you need the rear first to find that benefit from the front?
    White 96 GXL V6, LPG

  14. #14

    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    Which end should I fit first?

    This is dependent on the vehicle, its existing diff types, the type of suspension system and the model availability. However the front is usually the first choice.

    a. If the vehicle is an IFS (Independent Front Suspension) model then the front fitment will result in the greatest increase in 4WD ability. This is because all IFS vehicles have very limited suspension movement (hence limited wheel travel and articulation) resulting in easily lifted wheels and total loss of front traction. Fitting a LOKKA to the front will solve this serious deficiency. (Pajero, Isuzu, 4Runner, B2600 etc)

    b. If a vehicle has a good quality LSD in the rear, then a front fitment will obviously provide the best total traction ie one locker and one LSD is better than one locker and one standard diff. (GQ)

    c. If a vehicle has a poor quality LSD then the issue becomes less clear and personal preference or ease of installation often become the more important criteria. However one LSD and one locker is still a better choice - if that is possible. (Landcruiser, Hilux, F100/150)

    d. If the vehicle is a constant 4WD then a rear fitment is the easiest and best solution (Landcruiser 80,100 series etc)

    e. A front fitment will actually yield the greatest improvement in off road ability. This is because, most vehicles require the increase in traction (that a locker gives) when hill climbing. Under hill climbing conditions, due to the angle of the vehicle, the rear wheels are carrying a much greater weight (weight transfer) and the front wheels are therefore carrying a lessor weight and tend to break traction very easily. Once one front wheel starts to spin, the other front wheel stops turning and the whole front diff ceases to provide traction. At this point all load is transferred onto the rear as if it were a 2WD and due to the increased load the rear wheels are encouraged to spin and the vehicle stops.
    If you can solve the problem of the front wheels spinning, you have solved the traction problem. Another advantage is that on road there are no changes to normal driving characteristics at all.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    THIS is all to do with a AUTO locker not a air locker you can switch on and off , The auto locker would only fit in the rear of a Prado (full time 4wd ) . I would fit the air locker to the rear first , The rear axle has lots more travel to keep the wheels on the track , the toyota LSD is useless ,most of the weight of the car is on the rear wheels when going up hill ,and as for fitting to the front to save the CVs the locker in the rear will stop the front wheels spinning, Both back wheels would have to spin before the front spins . Go the rear , I had a 90 with the locker in the rear , works very well.

  15. #15

    Re: Prado ARB Air Locker?

    Guys, I have ordered an ARB RD 90 for mine, so I'll keep you posted. I have an electric factory locker in the rear already, so with front, back and center in, I shall be fully locked. Just hope I don't need to get around any bends!
    KZJ90 front and rear winches, Safari Snorkel, 40mm OME lift, 40mm Body lift, BFG MT, 1000w Inverter, 0n-board air, drawer system, X-Lites, triple battery, triple lockers, steel bumpers, custom sliders, rack off an old van.

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